Will there be a season 6 of “SEAL Team”? David Boreanaz on the future and the move to Paramount+ | Entertainment

The good news is that the SEAL Team The Season 5 finale is sure to have you talking, given that major cliffhanger. The bad news is that Paramount+ still have to renew it.

The military drama has moved to the streaming service after four seasons and four episodes on SCS, a transition that has, for the most part, gone smoothly. And to top off one of its best seasons yet, one that explored the characters’ home lives and the effects on the fighters (especially with by David Boreanaz Jason Hayes, who is now facing his TBI), SEAL Team left all of Bravo in grave danger.

Boreanaz discusses a possible season 6, reflects on Jason’s journey, shares what he’d like to see next, and more.

The finale was so good and such a great way to end a fantastic season.

David Boreanaz: Yes, it was a good season. I think of all the seasons, this may have been the hardest season to shoot. And you kinda think to yourself why would that be? I think even though we had a limited number of shows ordered – we had four episodes on CBS that launched us into this world of streaming, [and] for us, [it was] just a little getting used to. So it was kind of hard to feel that in the first four episodes and then move around and then settle in and figure out how it’s going to work. I think we did it pretty well.

But the episodes were so intense once we recovered. There’s something about network television, where you have the formula and you kind of hit the acts and this and that. Once we moved into the world of streaming, I know we’ve been able to open it up a bit, and I think the good thing is that we’re even going to connect to it a bit more in terms of, what- does that mean? How to do these shows? So it was difficult on that aspect.

But those were just big episodes and the timing – we shoot our 10 hour show in seven days. I don’t think you can see a show that does that. We’re an efficient group of people and we’re an executive producer on the show, along with Spencer [Hudnut] and Chris Chulack, it allows us to really dig deep and figure out how we can do these shows – and have a great line producer – but it’s a lot of work in a lot less time to produce what we did. I’m really proud of it. I watch those shows and they’re great and the production value is great, and for what we had, and the cast was phenomenal this season. It was a difficult journey, but we made it.

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Have you heard of a sixth season?

I can not tell. [Laughs] What I could say is that we did a good job for Paramount+. You look at the numbers and the streaming then we’ve been trending as one of their number one shows for the last few weeks. So we do them good.

It’s been a harrowing journey all season for Jason, from his memory exercise with the fridge…

Is not it? It was hard. The episode where we did ayahuasca, that was a fun episode to do, but it really allowed us to go into some formats of stuff that allowed us to go a little deeper and do the light in those dark minds of those guys. It was a journey for me and difficult to do. And I was proud and happy that it happened like that. I keep coming back to this show as a remarkable force to show what’s going on in the lives of these men and women, and it’s too bad that we as a country don’t recognize that as much as they do. should. I think we might be the only military show on TV today.

Parisa Fakhri as Naima, Neil Brown Jr as Ray in SEAL Team

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So you got what Ray [Neil Brown Jr.] and Naima [Parisa Fakhri] done [looking at how to help vets when they’re home], it’s also very important and you highlight it in the show.

Oh, absolutely. That’s what the show does, it examines that. And we just, as a society for some reason, when shit hits the fan, we come together, right? When shit don’t hit the fan, I’m not saying we don’t get together. There are those who are always systematically united. But it’s just a subject that people don’t really like to talk about. Look what SEAL Team did at the production level. If you take all of our shows and watch those shows, I would compare them to any movie. I want. Production value. Practically done. We have special effects, but the way we do it real and live and practically is right, you can’t measure it by the shows – again, we’re a military show, but I really oppose it to not any movie. If you put this stuff on the IMAX, you’d be blown away. We should make an IMAX movie. [Laughs] It would be so wild. Oh my God.

I think what we also gained was obviously the love for the character. These people love these characters and where they’re going and it takes time for people to invest in a show and find a show and then watch it, come on, wow, that was a wild ride. These characters are fun to accompany, and I think that’s where we’re at. I think the show’s recognition, now on Paramount+, will benefit us even more in terms of whatever you’re looking to benefit from. To me it’s just the message and the story and showing it to people like, that’s what these guys do, and that’s why you get up and have a cup of coffee in the morning and go in your car and drive and have a smoothie and you’re free, you’re protected, and few people will remember or think about it.

I don’t want to stand out politically here. I’m just saying that I love the series. I like the season. Yes, it was hard because it was so compact. I was saying to Spencer and Chris, damn it, man, the mental and physical exhaustion alone for my character this year was just increased tenfold. I think it’s because we had less hours to do it and less days to do it, and it got so detailed and small in an order size that it got bigger, if that has sense. For me, it was like that.

David Boreanaz as Jason in SEAL Team

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You played Angel for about eight years between buffy and angel, Booth for 12 years BONE, and in this finale, when Clay tells him he’s leaving, Jason tells him he’ll still be here when he returns. After five seasons now, how much longer do you think you’ll be playing Jason?

I do not know. I think for me it really ties into the stories we tell and I’m even more excited about the move to Paramount+. I find out of all the streaming networks, this one is very positive and they are very aggressive in the way they do their shows. I still feel like this show is moving there and the potential to move on to another season and so on, the show won’t be drastically different, but it will have a slower burn. It will be more like what happens in two weeks on a 10 episode order. It’s not just this huge season of – we don’t have to invest that much in certain areas of the storylines, but it can be like, hey, they get up, and it’s their day and it’s 10 episodes. It is very similar to like a 24 sort of look, but now you can really get into the skin of the characters, see where these men and women are, and see how they are affected from the time they wake up to the time they go to bed. I think it’s fascinating.

I feel like this season, in particular, just showed how many more stories there are for all the characters to tell, like with Davis [Toni Trucks] expands into a new world.

Yes. Yes she is. It’s phenomenal. When I led the [penultimate] episode, I really wanted to highlight Davis’ strengths and this character was really from a real person who [executive producer] Mark Owen knew it. She was just a badass and didn’t take any shit, and I really wanted to explore that with Toni playing Davis. I think we did a good job and I was happy to see her doing all that physical work and her stunts and she was pregnant so it was like, wow. We were very careful and safe, but she loved it. She had a great time and it was great to see Toni step into that, those times.

What do you hope to explore with Jason in the future?

It’s so interesting. I don’t know how he’s going to come out of this season. Victory? I do not know. Injury? It will be interesting. Born July 4 movement? I’m still excited for his adversities. Whatever Jason has to punch in adversities, it doesn’t matter to me, it’s like great character study. I have to overcome that to get there. I think that’s Jason’s life, and I’m excited to play that.

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