special operations – Beyond The Sixth Seal http://beyondthesixthseal.net/ Mon, 21 Feb 2022 09:06:06 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://beyondthesixthseal.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/profile.png special operations – Beyond The Sixth Seal http://beyondthesixthseal.net/ 32 32 Former Navy Seals Officer Jocko Willink to Headline Lucido Global Event https://beyondthesixthseal.net/former-navy-seals-officer-jocko-willink-to-headline-lucido-global-event/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 15:50:57 +0000 https://beyondthesixthseal.net/former-navy-seals-officer-jocko-willink-to-headline-lucido-global-event/ ELLICOTT CITY, Maryland (PRWEB) 06 January 2022 Lucido Global, a real estate company based in Ellicott City, MD, today announced Momentum, a new annual event that will be open to the public with reduced rates for licensed realtors. Momentum will take place on February 19, 2022 in Orlando, Florida and will be headlined by retired […]]]>

Lucido Global, a real estate company based in Ellicott City, MD, today announced Momentum, a new annual event that will be open to the public with reduced rates for licensed realtors. Momentum will take place on February 19, 2022 in Orlando, Florida and will be headlined by retired US Navy SEAL Jocko Willink.

Jocko Willink is a retired US Navy SEAL Lieutenant Commander, co-author of the #1 New York Times bestseller Extreme Ownership: How US Navy SEALs Lead and Win, and host of the top-rated Jocko Podcast. As Task Unit Commander SEAL Team Three during the Battle of Ramadi, Willink orchestrated the SEAL operations that helped stabilize the violent, war-torn city. The Bruiser Task Unit became the most decorated special operations unit of the Iraq War. Jocko returned from Iraq to serve as the officer in charge of training for all West Coast SEAL teams. There he led the development of leadership training and personally instructed and mentored the next generation of SEAL leaders who went on to perform with great success on the battlefield. Jocko is a recipient of Silver Star, Bronze Star, and many other personal and unit awards.

By hosting Momentum, Lucido Global is proud to partner with Chime Technologies Inc, which has helped Lucido Global reach over $1,000,000,000 in annual sales for the first time. Chime and Lucido Global are excited to welcome this remarkable growth opportunity for individuals seeking to become better leaders and more effective business operators.

Ticket prices and other information can be found at FindYourBigMo.com. After the event, Jocko will sign copies of Extreme Ownership for audience members who purchase the VIP Package. For sponsorship inquiries, please contact RobertLucido@LucidoGlobal.com.

Lucido Global has over 47 locations and approximately 400 team members in Arizona, California, Canada, Colorado, Washington, DC, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Kansas, Maryland, Missouri, Nevada, Oklahoma, Oregon, Texas, Virginia, and Washington . Lucido Global continues to be one of the top ranked teams nationally and internationally.

To learn more about Lucido Global and the markets they serve, visit LucidoGlobal.com. Lucido Global’s corporate headquarters are located at 9251 Baltimore National Pike, Suite D, Ellicott City, MD 21042.

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About Lucido Global:

Lucido Global is a leading Maryland-based real estate team comprising over 400 real estate professionals in various locations across the United States. Lucido Global is a top expansion network with Keller Williams, the world’s largest real estate franchise, and has been recognized by The Wall Street Journal and REALTrends as the #1 real estate team in the nation. Lucido Global delivers the ultimate real estate experience by delivering incredible value and exceptional service to clients and agents. To learn more, visit LucidoGlobal.com.

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Former Navy Seal Officer Jocko Willink to Headline Lucido Global Event | News https://beyondthesixthseal.net/former-navy-seal-officer-jocko-willink-to-headline-lucido-global-event-news/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 15:40:00 +0000 https://beyondthesixthseal.net/former-navy-seal-officer-jocko-willink-to-headline-lucido-global-event-news/ ELLICOTT CITY, Maryland., January 6, 2022 / PRNewswire-PRWeb / – Ellicott City, Marylandbased real estate company Lucido Global today announced Momentum, a new annual event that will be open to the public with reduced rates for licensed real estate agents. Momentum will be held on February 19, 2022 in Orlando florida and will be titled […]]]>

ELLICOTT CITY, Maryland., January 6, 2022 / PRNewswire-PRWeb / – Ellicott City, Marylandbased real estate company Lucido Global today announced Momentum, a new annual event that will be open to the public with reduced rates for licensed real estate agents. Momentum will be held on February 19, 2022 in Orlando florida and will be titled by retired US Navy SEAL Jocko willink.

Jocko willink is a retired US Navy SEAL Lieutenant Commander, co-author of # 1 New York Times bestselling Extreme Ownership: How the US Navy SEALs Lead and Win, and Host of the Best Jocko Podcast. As commander of the Bruiser Task Unit of SEAL Team Three during the Battle of Ramadi, Willink orchestrated the SEAL operations that helped stabilize the violent and war-torn city. Task Force Bruiser became the most decorated special operations unit in the Iraq War. Jocko came back from Iraq serve as the training officer for all SEAL teams on the West Coast. There he led the development of leadership training and personally trained and mentored the next generation of SEAL leaders who continued to perform with great success on the battlefield. Jocko is the recipient of Silver Star, Bronze Star and many other personal and unit awards.

By hosting Momentum, Lucido Global is proud to partner with Chime Technologies Inc, which has helped Lucido Global to more than $ 1,000,000,000 in annual sales for the first time. Chime and Lucido Global are delighted to welcome this remarkable growth opportunity for individuals seeking to become better leaders and more effective business operators.

Ticket prices and other information are available at FindYourBigMo.com. After the event, Jocko will sign copies of Extreme Ownership for members of the public who purchase the VIP package. For sponsorship requests, please contact RobertLucido@LucidoGlobal.com.

Lucido Global has more than 47 locations and around 400 team members in Arizona, California, Canada, Colorado, Washington DC, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Kansas, Maryland, Missouri, Nevada, Oklahoma, Oregon, Texas, Virginia and Washington. Lucido Global continues to be one of the top ranked teams nationally and internationally.

To learn more about Lucido Global and the markets they serve, visit LucidoGlobal.com. Lucido Global’s head office is located at 9251 Baltimore National Pike, Suite D, Ellicott City, Maryland 21042.

VIDEO ANNOUNCEMENT:

https://youtu.be/wCGYxwbAaC8

About Lucido Global:

Lucido Global is a MarylandA leading real estate team of over 400 real estate professionals in various locations across United States. Lucido Global is among the premier expansion networks with Keller Williams, the world’s largest real estate franchise, and has been recognized by The Wall Street Journal and REALTrends as the nation’s # 1 real estate team. Lucido Global delivers the ultimate real estate experience by delivering incredible value and exceptional service to clients and agents. To find out more, visit LucidoGlobal.com.

Media contact

Marie sheehan, RUHM Luxury Marketing, 1 833.777.6275, marie@ruhm.com

SOURCE Lucido Global

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Richard Marcinko, founder of US Navy SEAL team 6, dies at 81 https://beyondthesixthseal.net/richard-marcinko-founder-of-us-navy-seal-team-6-dies-at-81/ Wed, 05 Jan 2022 05:42:27 +0000 https://beyondthesixthseal.net/richard-marcinko-founder-of-us-navy-seal-team-6-dies-at-81/ Richard Marcinko, founder and first commander of SEAL Team Six, passed away on Christmas Day. Marcinko has had a long and unique career, gaining attention for his leadership and unconventional style. Despite the imperfections in his record, Marcinko is remembered by many as a visionary in special operations. Loading Something is loading. At the end […]]]>
  • Richard Marcinko, founder and first commander of SEAL Team Six, passed away on Christmas Day.
  • Marcinko has had a long and unique career, gaining attention for his leadership and unconventional style.
  • Despite the imperfections in his record, Marcinko is remembered by many as a visionary in special operations.

At the end of a turbulent year, the Navy SEAL community has lost one of its most influential and controversial members.

Retired Cmdr. Richard “Dick” Marcinko, the founder and first commander of the elite SEAL Team Six, died at age 81 on Christmas Day.

The military career of the famous Navy SEAL got off to a bad start. When a young Marcinko went to his local Marine Corps recruiting office to enlist, he was shown the door because he did not have a high school diploma.

But the Navy accepted an enthusiastic Marcinko as their radio. Eager for adventure and hardship, Marcinko volunteered for Naval Special Warfare and graduated from the grueling underwater demolition training, before being assigned to Underwater Demolition Team 21.

Seeing his natural leadership and promises, his superiors recommended Marcinko for the Naval Officer Candidate School, and he quickly became an officer. He was then deployed to Vietnam with SEAL Team Two.

Richard marcinko

Marcinko, then commander of the US Navy, in 1978

US Navy


“Demo Dick”, as it became known, was highly decorated, winning the Silver Star, the third highest award for bravery under fire, and four Bronze Stars, as well as the Vietnamese Cross of Gallantry on both missions combat in Vietnam.

The North Vietnamese feared him so much that they put a price on his head.

After the Vietnam War, Marcinko was the commander of SEAL Team Two from 1974 to 1976.

In this role, he began to develop a counterterrorism capability for special naval warfare. Initially, it was only a cell, known as “Mobility 6”, within SEAL Team Two.

But when the Iranian hostage crisis highlighted the need for a dedicated counterterrorism force, the Navy tasked Marcinko with developing an equivalent to the Army’s Delta Force.

JOINT Team 6

richard marcinko

Richard Marcinko.

YouTube / AUMAlumni


There were only two SEAL teams at the time, but Marcinko, a natural bluffer, chose to call the new unit SEAL Team Six to trick Soviet intelligence into believing that there were multiple teams.

In forming SEAL Team Six – later renamed Naval Special Warfare Development Group (DEVGRU) – Marcinko selected its operators from the crème de la crème of Naval Special Warfare, choosing SEALs with combat experience. The unit’s board owners included Navy SEAL legends such as Medal of Honor recipient Mike Thornton.

During the early days of the unit, Marcinko fired one of his junior officers. It’s not uncommon, but it’s not the last time the SEALs saw this junior officer, whose name was William McRaven.

McRaven rebounded from what could have been a career-ending development and went on to lead the US Special Operations Command and its sub-command, the Joint Special Operations Command, both of which oversee the SEAL Six team. McRaven also commanded Operation Neptune Spear, the SEAL Team Six mission that killed Osama bin Laden in Abbottabad, Pakistan, in 2011.

Marcinko succeeded in establishing the Navy’s counterterrorism unit, but his controversial ways soon clashed with the leadership of the Navy and SOCOM. The operators of the SEAL Six team were efficient but looked more like pirates than professional troops.

“Marcinko was truly the first famous SEAL. He worked hard and partied. He wore his unconventional ways in everything he did, and he was largely successful if you look back,” a Navy SEAL operator, who was not authorized to speak to the press, Insider said.

“Some might say he ‘poisoned’ the unit he created, but it was Dick. Whatever his vices, Dick Marcinko left his mark in SEAL history and shaped it as few others, ”SEAL said.

In 1983, Marcinko relinquished command of his unit and moved to the “Red Cell,” a small unit designed to test and find vulnerabilities in some of the Pentagon’s more classified facilities.

Marcinko was “an end-to-end team guy,” but gained a mixed reputation, said a former Navy SEAL officer. “On the one hand, he created Development Group [SEAL Team Six], but on the other hand, it encouraged bad culture. We recently saw the ugly aspects of this culture all over the news. “

The controversy followed Marcinko out of service. In 1989 he was charged with receiving $ 100,000 from an arms dealer in order to secure a contract with the Navy for hand grenades. The former frogman denied the charges, but ended up serving 15 months of a 21-month sentence in federal prison.

Despite the imperfections in his record, Marcinko left a mark on the US special ops community, and many remember a visionary who knew how to play with the system and manage the bureaucracy.

“Whatever your opinion of him, the man was a leader, there’s no doubt about it. He had that aura of leadership that drives people to do things, to act. It’s natural leadership that you can’t. not teach, “a former Navy SEAL officer told Insider. . “Those lucky few to have it immediately stood out.”

Stavros Atlamazoglou is a Special Operations Defense Journalist, Hellenic Army Veteran (national service with the 575th Navy Battalion and Army HQ) and a graduate of Johns Hopkins University.

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Richard Marcinko, first SEAL 6 team commander, dies at 81 https://beyondthesixthseal.net/richard-marcinko-first-seal-6-team-commander-dies-at-81/ Tue, 28 Dec 2021 17:48:24 +0000 https://beyondthesixthseal.net/richard-marcinko-first-seal-6-team-commander-dies-at-81/ Richard Marcinko, who founded Navy’s SEAL Team 6 after receiving honors as a SEAL leader on two tours of Vietnam, has died on Christmas Day at the age of 81, the National Navy SEAL Museum has reported. With the Navy in need of an elite unit dedicated to the fight against terrorism after the Pentagon’s […]]]>

Richard Marcinko, who founded Navy’s SEAL Team 6 after receiving honors as a SEAL leader on two tours of Vietnam, has died on Christmas Day at the age of 81, the National Navy SEAL Museum has reported.

With the Navy in need of an elite unit dedicated to the fight against terrorism after the Pentagon’s failure to rescue American hostages in Iran in 1980, the chief of naval operations, Admiral Thomas B. Hayward, chose Marcinko to put together the new SEAL team, according to the Fort Pierce, Fla., Museum. Marcinko, known as “Demo Dick”, commanded the SEAL 6 team for about three years, retired from the Navy in 1989 as commander, and went on to write a series of fiction books and books. non-fiction based on Navy SEALs.

“Dick Marcinko has played a very unique role in the history of SEAL, leaving a legacy like no other,” the SEAL Museum wrote in a Facebook post on Sunday announcing his death. “‘Demo Dick’ is regarded as America’s premier counterterrorism operator. We extend our deepest condolences to his family, teammates and friends.”

His family confirmed his death at his home in Fauquier County, Va., In a message on Twitter.

Marcinko, the son of a Pennsylvania coal miner, enlisted in the Navy in 1958 after dropping out of high school, according to his successful 1992 autobiography “Rogue Warrior.” He trained in underwater demolition as a sailor before being commissioned through the Officer Candidate School in 1965. He was deployed less than two years later in Vietnam with the SEAL 2 team.

In Vietnam, Marcinko became known for carrying out successful SEAL assaults, including a May 1967 raid on Ilo Ilo Hon, which the SEAL Museum described as the Navy’s most successful SEAL operation in the Mekong Delta.

“Because of his strong leadership and great success, the North Vietnamese army has placed a bounty on his head, payable to anyone who could capture and kill him,” according to the SEAL Museum. “Marcinko was never taken.”

He led a SEAL platoon in a second deployment to Vietnam, ultimately winning the Silver Star and four Bronze Star medals with “V” fighting for bravery, according to the museum.

Marcinko was serving in the Pentagon in the April 1980 rescue attempt by US special operators to free 52 US diplomats and citizens held hostage five months earlier by Iranian students supporting the Iranian revolution. The failure of Operation Eagle Claw – including the deaths of eight U.S. service members – has prompted the Pentagon to rethink its response to global crises.

“It was embarrassing to think that this all-powerful nation couldn’t get 50 of its own people out of Iran,” Marcinko said in a 2019 interview with the SOFREP online publication focused on special operations. “Everyone got egg in their face… and these are retired admirals and generals who went out and looked at all the things that messed up and basically came out and said we should… have a dedicated standing force to the fight against terrorism. “

Hayward, the CNO, tasked Marcinko with designing the unit, selecting its members, training them and being its initial commander. He chose the best SEALs and underwater demolition specialists to build what would become the Navy’s most elite and famous unit. He told SOFREP that he even took the opportunity to play with the Soviet Union – naming the unit Team Six even though only two SEAL teams existed at the time.

“We did not have [SEAL Team] three, four or five, “he said.” I picked six for my lucky number – let’s let the Soviets figure out where the others are. “

After leaving the Navy, Marcinko went to work in business, gave motivational speeches and wrote about 20 books, including several bestsellers. After writing about his career in the Navy in his autobiography, Marcinko wrote a series of novels in which he was the protagonist.

Jim DeFelice, who co-authored six of the books with Marcinko, called his co-author an “American hero,” in a Twitter post on Monday.

“As far as I know, Dick and his warriors never traveled to Hell, but if they had, I’m sure the devil would have found a place to hide rather than face them,” wrote DeFelice. Dick’s indomitable courage was legendary, but his sense of humor and generosity ran equally deep. He was a man who never took ‘no’ for an answer, or who never faced it. to a challenge he couldn’t master. We didn’t just lose. a warrior; we lost a great man. “

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6 wild facts about the deadly creator of SEAL Team Six https://beyondthesixthseal.net/6-wild-facts-about-the-deadly-creator-of-seal-team-six/ Fri, 19 Nov 2021 20:01:35 +0000 https://beyondthesixthseal.net/6-wild-facts-about-the-deadly-creator-of-seal-team-six/ Today, Richard Marcinko is a business trainer, author and motivational speaker. In its early years, “Demo Dick” was the United States’ first counterterrorism operator. Marcinko enlisted in the US Navy in 1958 and eventually rose through the ranks to the rank of commander, earned degrees in international relations and political science, and won 34 medals […]]]>

Today, Richard Marcinko is a business trainer, author and motivational speaker. In its early years, “Demo Dick” was the United States’ first counterterrorism operator. Marcinko enlisted in the US Navy in 1958 and eventually rose through the ranks to the rank of commander, earned degrees in international relations and political science, and won 34 medals and citations, including a silver star. , the Legion of Merit and four bronze. Stars. But that’s just his military CV.

Even among the ranks of US special operators, Marcinko, his track record and reputation are all exceptional – and it’s easy to see why. At 77, he still trains corporate executives as well as American and foreign hostage rescue teams. He even worked as a consultant on the FOX TV show. 24. His memories, Rogue warrior, is a New York Times bestseller.

“I’m good at war,” Marcinko told People magazine. “Even in Vietnam, the system prevented me from hunting and killing as many enemies as I would have liked.”

1) North Vietnam had a bounty on its head

As a platoon leader in Vietnam, Marcinko and his SEALs were so successful that the North Vietnamese military took note. Its assault on Ilo Ilo Island has been called the Mekong Delta’s most successful SEAL operation. During his second tour, Marcinko and SEAL Team Two teamed up with Army Special Forces in the Tet Offensive at Chau Doc. The SEALs rescued hospital staff caught in the crossfire as an all-out urban brawl raged around them.

Due to Marcinko’s daring and success, the NVA placed a bounty of 50,000 piastres on his head, payable to anyone who could prove he had killed the leader of the SEALs. Obviously, they never paid that premium.

(US Navy)

2) He was rejected by the Marine Corps

Marcinko joined the army at 18 but surprisingly (for some) he did not choose to join the Navy first. His first stop was the Marine Corps, which dismissed him outright because he had not graduated from high school. Then Marcinko, who will leave as Commander, enlists in the Navy. He then became an officer after graduating from the Naval Postgraduate School, earning his commission in 1965.

3) He designed the Navy’s counterterrorism operation

You know you’ve been successful when they make a video game about the story of your life.

After the tragic failure of Operation Eagle Claw, the US attempt to free hostages held by students in Iran, the US Navy and its special operations structure decided they needed an overhaul. Richard Marcinko was one of those who helped design the new system. His response was the creation of SEAL Team Six.

4) He numbered his SEAL team “Six” to deceive the Russians

When he created the all-new SEAL team, the United States and the Soviet Union were locked in the Cold War – and spies were everywhere. Not believing that anyone would keep the creation of his new unit a secret, he numbered it SEAL Team Six in order to trick the KGB into believing that there were three other SEAL Teams they didn’t know about.

5) His job was to infiltrate the bases – American bases

The Navy needed to know where their operational sensitivities were, where they were weakest. Even in areas where security was considered the strictest, the Navy was desperate to see if it could be infiltrated. So Vice Admiral James Lyons tasked Marcinko with creating another unit.

Beyond Neptune Spear: The Secret (Open) Story of SEAL Team Six (Part 1)

Read more : Beyond Neptune Spear: The Secret (Open) Story of SEAL Team Six (Part 1)

Richard Marcinko created the OP-06D Naval Security Coordination Team, also known as Red Cell, a 13-man unit. Twelve were from SEAL Team Six and one from Marine Force Recon. They had to enter secure areas, nuclear submarines, Navy ships and even Air Force One. Red Cell was able to infiltrate and leave without warning. The reason? Serving military personnel have been replaced by contract civilian security officers.

A team
Just like the A-Team, except in real life. And Marcinko is in charge. And he is the only one. And he killed a lot more people. (NBC Universal Television)

6) He spent 15 months in prison

Towards the end of his career, he became embroiled in what the Navy called a “bribe scandal”, alleging that Richard Marcinko conspired with an Arizona arms dealer to receive $ 100,000. for getting a government contract for hand grenades. Marcinko argued that this accusation was the result of a witch hunt, a backlash for exposing so many vulnerabilities and embarrassing the Navy’s most senior officers. He served 15 months of a 21-month sentence.

This article was written by Blake Stilwell and originally published on WE ARE THE MIGHTY.

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SEAL Team 1 pays tribute to its first commander, who died in May https://beyondthesixthseal.net/seal-team-1-pays-tribute-to-its-first-commander-who-died-in-may/ Tue, 28 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://beyondthesixthseal.net/seal-team-1-pays-tribute-to-its-first-commander-who-died-in-may/ Members of the SEAL 1 team gathered this month to commemorate and honor the first commander of the SEAL 1 team, Captain David “Dave” Del Giudice, who died in May at the age of 88. Del Guidice’s wife, sons and former roommate joined Team SEAL 1 on San Clemente Island on September 16 to tour […]]]>

Members of the SEAL 1 team gathered this month to commemorate and honor the first commander of the SEAL 1 team, Captain David “Dave” Del Giudice, who died in May at the age of 88.

Del Guidice’s wife, sons and former roommate joined Team SEAL 1 on San Clemente Island on September 16 to tour the training areas where Navy SEALs are made and to exchange memorabilia from the legendary leader.

“The Naval Special Warfare community has lost a valuable teammate and one of the accomplished professionals of the SEAL team with the passing of Dave Del Giudice,” said Rear Admiral HW Howard, commander of US Naval Special Warfare Command, according to a Navy press release shortly after his death. . “He will be remembered as a quiet professional, the one who shaped our history, supporting the tenants of our Ethos and serving as an inspiration to those he led.”

During the memorial service, four members of the SEAL 1 team spread the ashes of Del Giudice as they swam off the coast of San Clemente Island. They also gave his wife a folded American flag, a SEAL Trident and SEAL Team 1 command part upon their return.

“Now that he’s moved on to his final pickup line for the extract, we can confidently say his work on Earth is done; he ran well, and his mission is over, ”Navy Chaplain Lt. Cmdr. Stephen Griffin said during the memorial service, according to the press release.

The friend of Del Giudice, the retired lieutenant commander was also present at the ceremony. Timothy “Tad” A. Devine, who was a roommate with Del Giudice during the replacement formation of the underwater demolition team in 1958.

Following UDT / R training, Del Giudice was assigned to Underwater Demolition Team 12, where he served as the team’s platoon commander, officer in charge and executive officer, and deployed to Vietnam . While there, he was the deputy flotilla commander and worked with 10 other members of UDT 12 to provide the Laotian government with landing craft across the Mekong River.

This experience was crucial when the then chief of naval operations, Arleigh Burke, authorized the creation of SEAL teams in December 1961. He appointed Del Giudice as the commander of the SEAL 1 team.

Del Giudice returned to Vietnam in January 1962 and was tasked with helping to train Vietnamese Coastal Force personnel in reconnaissance and guerrilla warfare, and to train future classes of Biet Hai. [Special Sea Force] commandos.

In total, Del Giudice served in the Navy for 24 years and postings after his stint as Commander of Team SEAL 1 included the role of Budget Sponsor for Naval Coastal Warfare Commands in the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations. , and as the first operations officer for Naval Special Warfare Group 1′s predecessor, Naval Operations Support Group Pacific.

Del Guidice’s last posting was as commanding officer of Naval Amphibious Base Coronado, California. He retired in 1978.

The United States Special Operations Command, established in 1987, chose Del Giudice as the 2010 Commando Hall of Honor laureate.

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Member of the Seal team: “We never give up” | Culture & Leisure https://beyondthesixthseal.net/member-of-the-seal-team-we-never-give-up-culture-leisure/ Sat, 18 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://beyondthesixthseal.net/member-of-the-seal-team-we-never-give-up-culture-leisure/ Tim Farley, for the town sentry Robert O’Neill, one of the nation’s most decorated NAVY seals and author of “The operatorThe Servant’s Church told the audience on September 16 that SEAL teams are as effective as they are because of preparation and teamwork. “Most importantly, we never give up,” he said. Becoming the leader of […]]]>

Tim Farley, for the town sentry

Robert O’Neill, one of the nation’s most decorated NAVY seals and author of “The operatorThe Servant’s Church told the audience on September 16 that SEAL teams are as effective as they are because of preparation and teamwork.

“Most importantly, we never give up,” he said.

Becoming the leader of the SEAL 6 team was not easy. He described the rigorous training to become a SEAL followed by nine months of additional training to be part of JOINT Team 6, which included intense physical labor, oral counseling and psychological assessment.

All of this combined provided “the stress of combat in a controlled training environment,” he said.

In combat, O’Neill said he was scared all the time.

“If someone says they were not afraid, it is because they are lying or because they are a sociopath,” he said.

The hardest part of being a member of the SEAL team is not the fight, but rather “kissing your child goodbye”. O’Neill recalled attending his 4-year-old daughter’s school Easter party in Virginia when he received a text calling her homework.

The operation focused on the rescue of the cargo ship Capt. Richard Phillips from a boat in the Indian Ocean.

O’Neill led the operation that rescued Phillips from the Somali pirates who seized the Maersk Alabama ship on April 8, 2009. Phillips was rescued four days later by the Navy SEAL team.

Then came May 2, 2011, when SEAL Team 6 flew a “one-way” mission to capture or kill terrorist Osama bin Laden, the mastermind of the September 11 tragedy that killed more than 3,000 Americans.

After entering bin Laden’s Pakistani compound, the SEALs rushed into his house, climbed the stairs, kicked the bedroom door open, and shot the terrorist in the head.

O’Neill was credited with the three shots that killed bin Laden, the world’s most wanted man for a decade and leader of Al Qaeda.

As the team flew towards their mission, O’Neill said he remembered many members of the team talking about the potential death sentence they were walking in. Although an American helicopter crashed inside the complex and a gun battle ensued, there were no American casualties.

O’Neill remembered the helicopter flight from Pakistan as he constantly looked at his watch. Finally, the pilot told the SEAL team, “Gentlemen, welcome to Afghanistan. Those words, O’Neill said, were a relief to know that they were no longer in Pakistani airspace.

O’Neill’s book, “The operator“, has been described as a” jaw-dropping quick tale “of his 17 years as a Navy SEAL and his 400-mission career that took him and his team to four different theaters of war.

Over the course of his career, O’Neill has been decorated more than 52 times with honors.

By his charity, Your grateful nation, O’Neill works to educate and financially support military special operations personnel making the transition from battlefield to civilian life.

As a regular FOX News contributor, O’Neill provides expert analysis on terrorism and military strategy.

The town hall series will continue on October 21 with Dr. Marc Milstein speaking on preserving brain health, improving memory and reducing the risk of dementia. All conferences will be held at the Servant’s Church, 14343 N. MacArthur in Oklahoma City.

For more ticket information, contact Bonnie King at yvonneking@aol.com or call 405-202-4262. Tickets can be ordered online at okctownhall.org.

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Senior Navy SEAL officer quits after apparent disagreement with Trump https://beyondthesixthseal.net/senior-navy-seal-officer-quits-after-apparent-disagreement-with-trump/ Tue, 04 Feb 2020 08:00:00 +0000 https://beyondthesixthseal.net/senior-navy-seal-officer-quits-after-apparent-disagreement-with-trump/ Loading Something is loading. Special Warfare Rear Adm. Collin Green, the U.S. Navy admiral in charge of the service’s special operations forces, will step down in September, Interception reported this weekend. Green, the commanding officer of Naval Special Warfare Command, graduated from the US Naval Academy in 1986 and completed the Basic Underwater Demolition / […]]]>

Special Warfare Rear Adm. Collin Green, the U.S. Navy admiral in charge of the service’s special operations forces, will step down in September, Interception reported this weekend.

Green, the commanding officer of Naval Special Warfare Command, graduated from the US Naval Academy in 1986 and completed the Basic Underwater Demolition / SEAL course two years later. He served on SEAL Teams 2, 3 and 5 and in senior roles for NATO Special Operations Command and United States Central Command.

His retirement follows a controversial court martial by the chief of the Special Warfare Operator, Eddie Gallagher. Green offered to remove the Trident pin from Gallagher, which means membership in the Navy SEAL community.

Green in November ordered a peer review of Gallagher, who had been demoted and charged with war crimes, including the murder of an ISIS prisoner of war and the murder of two people in Iraq in 2017. Gallagher was acquitted of these charges but found guilty on a lesser charge of posing for a photo with the dead ISIS fighter.

However, President Donald Trump intervened in the Navy justice system to release Gallagher from pre-trial detention and restore his standing after conviction. Trump said he “supports our armed forces” and that “there has never been a president who is going to defend them, and has done it, as I have.”

The apparent disagreement between Green and the White House fueled controversy in the Gallagher affair.

“There is a long tradition in the military,” Timothy Parlatore, Gallagher’s civilian lawyer, says Navy Times. “You are not rebelling. You are resigning.”

The incident led to further resignations of Navy officials. Secretary of the Navy Richard Spencer was forced to resign after expressing his disagreement with Trump’s actions. According to a New York Times report, Spencer and Green had threatened to resign if Trump intervened on Gallagher’s behalf.

After his ouster in November, Spencer told CBS News he didn’t believe Trump “really understands the full definition of a fighter.”

“What message does this send to the troops? Said Spencer, a former naval officer. “May you get through this. We have to have good order and discipline. This is the backbone of what we do, and the Trident review process with the enlisted senior examining other enlisted seniors is essential. .

“The high ranking of our army is the backbone of our army,” added Spencer. “They are the backbone of good order and discipline. They can handle it. They can handle it in each of their communities.”

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Senior Navy SEAL Officer Tells Men ‘We Have A Problem’ Amid Scandals and Controversies https://beyondthesixthseal.net/senior-navy-seal-officer-tells-men-we-have-a-problem-amid-scandals-and-controversies/ Thu, 01 Aug 2019 07:00:00 +0000 https://beyondthesixthseal.net/senior-navy-seal-officer-tells-men-we-have-a-problem-amid-scandals-and-controversies/ The US Navy commander in charge of all SEAL teams told his men “we have a problem” in a memo written late last month after a series of scandals rocked the naval special warfare community . “Some of our subordinate formations have failed to maintain good order and discipline and therefore and for good reason […]]]>

The US Navy commander in charge of all SEAL teams told his men “we have a problem” in a memo written late last month after a series of scandals rocked the naval special warfare community .

“Some of our subordinate formations have failed to maintain good order and discipline and therefore and for good reason our NSW [Naval Special Warefare] culture is in question, ”Rear Admiral Collin Green wrote in the July 25 note obtained by Fox News on Thursday.

Green added that while “I don’t know yet if we have a culture issue, I know we have a problem of good order and discipline that needs to be addressed immediately. Good order and discipline are the foundation of any military organization and it is a responsibility of leadership. As a commander, I own it. As commodores, you also own it. “

BALL OF NAVY SEALS SENT FROM IRAQ FOR MISCONDUCT, REPORTS SHOW

The letter does not specifically refer to any incidents, which would include drug use and excessive alcohol consumption, involving members of the SEAL teams in the past few months,

SEAL commanders have until Aug. 7 to “develop a plan of action” on how to resolve the “problem,” according to the memo.

The letter was written the day after reports circulated that a Navy SEAL platoon from San Diego, Calif., Had been returned from Iraq to the United States due to “deterioration of good order and discipline. “.

The United States Special Operations Command said in a July 24 statement: “The commander has lost confidence in the team’s ability to accomplish the mission. “

The statement did not describe the exact nature of the misconduct, but The Washington Post, citing two defense officials, told the newspaper that the SEALs involved in the incident violated a blanket order banning alcohol consumption.

The platoon that was sent back to the United States is part of Team SEAL 7, whose members included Chief Eddie Gallagher, who was acquitted of war crimes charges last month but found guilty of posing with a dead ISIS fighter, the San Diego Union-Tribune reported.

Testimony at Gallagher’s court martial revealed that members of Team SEAL 7’s Alpha Platoon regularly consumed alcohol while deployed to Iraq in 2017, according to Military times.

NAVY SEAL EDWARD GALLAGHER DECLARED NOT GUILTY OF MURDER AND ATTEMPTED MURDER

The same week, the platoon was ordered to return to the United States, The time of the navy reported, citing an internal investigation, that six members of a Virginia-based SEAL team tested positive for the use of cocaine “and other banned substances” last year after repeatedly cheating to circumvent tests military drug testing.

Meanwhile, a member of the Navy SEAL 6 team who was named Sailor of the Year in 2016 has been charged with impersonation by texting to obtain photos of naked women, the Virginie-Pilot reported last week.

In May, a Navy SEAL pleaded guilty to the brutal death of a Green Beret soldier, admitting to participating in a late-night plot to break into the 34-year-old Army Sergeant Major. Logan Melgar’s chamber with a sledgehammer, put him in a choke and held him with duct tape while deployed to Africa.

Chief Special Warfare Operator Adam Matthews said along with another member of the Navy’s SEAL 6 team and two elite Marine Raiders, he led the “juvenile” attack on June 4, 2017. in Bamako, Mali.

Matthews’ attorney, Grover Baxley, said Melgar’s death was “an unforeseen accident which had a dramatic impact on the lives of everyone involved.”

According to The Washington Post, the tragedy occurred after a long night of drinking and partying. Two SEALs and two Marine Raiders forced their way into Melgar’s room with a hammer because they supposedly wanted to teach him a lesson for leaving them in traffic on their way to a party at the Embassy of France.

One of the SEALs jumped on Melgar and put him in a choke while Matthews grabbed Melgar’s legs. The two Marines then glued her legs together. When they passed Melgar’s wrists, they realized he had stopped breathing.

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In his memo, Green asked commanders to “engage everyone in your formations.”

He wrote: “I want all hands to understand that ‘we have a problem’ and this is our main effort and my top priority”

Fox News’ Dom Calicchio, Barnini Chakraborty and Bradford Betz contributed to this report.

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Navy SEAL officer killed in recreational skydiving accident https://beyondthesixthseal.net/navy-seal-officer-killed-in-recreational-skydiving-accident/ Wed, 04 Oct 2017 07:00:00 +0000 https://beyondthesixthseal.net/navy-seal-officer-killed-in-recreational-skydiving-accident/ According to the San Diego Union-Tribune, Navy SEAL Commanding Officer Seth A. Stone died in a recreational skydiving accident in Perris, Calif., on Saturday, September 30, 2017, when his parachute failed to open. The accident happened while Stone was off duty. Stone, a native of Texas, graduated from Basic Underwater Demolition / SEAL (BUD / […]]]>

According to the San Diego Union-Tribune, Navy SEAL Commanding Officer Seth A. Stone died in a recreational skydiving accident in Perris, Calif., on Saturday, September 30, 2017, when his parachute failed to open. The accident happened while Stone was off duty.

Stone, a native of Texas, graduated from Basic Underwater Demolition / SEAL (BUD / S) Class 241 on Nov. 15, 2002, in Coronado, Calif. He began his career in Naval Special Warfare (NSW) with the SEAL THREE team on the West Coast.

Since the crash happened while Stone was off duty, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is investigating the incident, which occurred after Stone jumped from a hot air balloon in the county. from Riverside. His parachute did not open properly and he perished on hitting the ground. We didn’t know why or how his parachute had malfunctioned. The FAA said it typically investigates whether parachutes are properly packed when investigating skydiving accidents.

According to the Union-Tribune, Commander Stone was recently posted to the United States Special Operations Command Pacific (SOCPAC) in Hawaii, a unit made up primarily of personnel from Naval Special Warfare Command (NSWC) in San Diego.

Stone was a decorated SEAL officer in combat, who won two Silver Stars, including one for his actions in 2006 in Ramadi, Iraq. During a firefight on September 29, 2006, Stone and the SEALs under his command were attacked with small arms and rockets. According to the quote from the Silver Star, Stone led a group of SEALs through the shooting at another group of injured SEALs, and then assisted in their evacuation.

During the same firefight, a SEAL serving under Stone’s command – SEAL Petty Officer Second Class Michael Mansoor – threw himself into an enemy grenade to save the lives of the men around him, and was killed in the process. Mansoor was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor for his action.

Commander Stone also received a Bronze Star with a “V” device for bravery and the Navy Medal of Honor. He received his commission from the US Naval Academy in 1999, then became a Surface Warfare Officer before being accepted into BUD / S and becoming a SEAL Officer.

Sadly, Stone is only the last Navy SEAL to be killed in a skydiving accident. The last SEAL killed in such an incident was Special Warfare Operator 1st Class (SO1) Remington J. Peters, a member of the Leap Frogs, who also died of a parachute malfunction on May 28, 2017. Leap Frogs identify themselves as the “United States Navy Parachute Team” and are typically made up of SEALs and other Navy Special Operations personnel.

A military time report of February 2017 pointed out that 11 special operations personnel had died in parachute training accidents between 2011 and 2016. Since 2004, in addition, 21 US SOF personnel have died in parachuting training accidents.

Image courtesy of MC3 Michelle L. Kapica / US Navy.

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