Seal Team Six founder has died aged 81

Richard ‘Dick’ Marcinko (pictured), senior commander of SEAL Team Six died on Sunday, aged 81

The first commander of SEAL Team Six – the much-vaunted US Navy counterterrorism unit that could search for and kill Osama Bin Laden – died Sunday at the age of 81.

Richard ‘Dick’ Marcinko was commissioned to design the counterterrorism workforce after the hostage disaster in Iran in 1979.

Marcinko, along with another Navy consultant, was trying to help free the American hostages in Iran, but had failed.

The mission, often known as Operation Eagle Claw, highlighted gaps in the U.S. Navy’s command structure and revealed the need for a full-time counterterrorism workforce.

Marcinko launched the United States’ Third SEAL Workforce in August 1980, calling it SEAL Team Six with the intention of making the KGB of the Soviet Union believe that there were three different SEAL groups than they hadn’t found out. He commanded the unit until July 1983.

The SEAL Six team then conducted Operation Neptune Spear in (* 81 *), Pakistan, and effectively killed al-Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden in May 2011. Bin Laden was the architect of the 11 September – in which 2,977 people lost their lives after four planes were hijacked and two were flown to the World Trade Center in New York – and one of the most wanted terrorists in history the United States.

Despite his successes, the commander ended up serving 15 months in jail after allegedly conspiring with an Arizona arms dealer to obtain $ 100,000 for securing a handgun contract with authorities. Marcinko denied the charges, saying it was a “witch hunt” carried out by top Navy officers who he embarrassed by exposing the vulnerabilities inside their models.

The National Navy UDT SEAL Museum, which confirmed his death Sunday afternoon on Facebook, said Marcinko played a “very special half in SEAL history, leaving an unparalleled legacy” and is remembered as the “premier counterterrorism operator” in the United States. The museum sent its condolences to members of his family.

The trigger for Marcinko’s death remains unknown at this time.

Marcinko (pictured) was tasked with designing the counterterrorism team after the Iran hostage crisis in 1979. The mission, Operation Eagle Claw, exposed the gaps in the US military command structure and revealed the need a full-time counterterrorism team.

Marcinko (pictured) was tasked with designing the counterterrorism workforce after the hostage disaster in Iran in 1979. The mission, Operation Eagle Claw, exposed gaps in the US Navy’s command structure and revealed the need for a full-time counterterrorism workforce.

Marcinko enlisted in the US Navy in 1958 and carried out two missions in Vietnam, climbing the ranks to the rank of commander.  He won 34 citations and medals, including the Silver Star, four Bronze Starts with V combat, two Navy Commendation Medals, and the Vietnamese Cross of Gallantry with Silver Star (Photo: US Navy Special Warfare Badge)

Marcinko enlisted in the US Navy in 1958 and made two excursions to Vietnam, working his means up to the rank of commander. He received 34 citations and medals as well as the Silver Star, 4 Bronze Debut with Combat V, two Navy Praise Medals and the Vietnamese Cross of Bravery with Silver Star (Photo: Special War Badge of the US Navy)

Marcinko, also known as “Demo Dick”, joined the Navy at the age of 18.

He first tried to join the Marine Corps, but was rejected because he did not graduate from high school. So, as a replacement, he enlisted in the US Navy in 1958 and became an officer after graduating from Navy graduate college, received his honoraria in 1965.

He made two excursions to Vietnam, working his means up to the rank of commander.

He received 34 citations and medals with the Silver Star, 4 bronze starts with combat V, two Navy Commendation Medals and the Vietnamese Cross of Gallantry with Silver Star, in response to NavySeals.com.

As section chief in Vietnam, Marcinko and SEAL Team Two had been so profitable that the North Vietnamese army placed a bounty of 50,000 piastres on his head, payable to anyone who could prove they had killed him. .

The Marcinko assault on May 18, 1967 on Ilo Ilo Island has since been recognized as the most profitable SEAL operation in the Mekong Delta, WeAreTheMighty.com reported.

During the operation, Marcinko and his men killed a large number of Viet Cong soldiers and destroyed six of their sampans.

The National Navy UDT SEAL Museum, which confirmed his death Sunday afternoon on Facebook, said Marcinko played a

The National Navy UDT SEAL Museum, which confirmed his death Sunday afternoon on Facebook, said Marcinko had played a “very special half in SEAL history, leaving an unparalleled legacy” and is remembered as the “leading counterterrorism operator” in the United States

On his second tour, Marcinko ordered his platoon to assist US Army Special Forces during the Tet offensive in Chau Doc in an effort to rescue American nurses and a teacher trapped in the metropolis.

SEAL’s workforce rescued the trapped personnel as an “all-out town brawl” raged around them.

“In Vietnam, I had found who can kill and who cannot fight,” Marcinko wrote in his ebook, Rogue Warrior.

“Less than half of SEAL Team Six had fought before. So there was only one option to find out who would play and who would freeze – who was to play that factor and see who did their job and who didn’t.

Marcinko was also tasked by Vice Admiral James Lyons to create an operational team that could infiltrate a space and go away without finding anything.

Despite his successes, Marcinko (pictured) ended up serving 15 months in prison after allegedly conspiring with an Arizona arms dealer to get $ 100,000 for securing a handgun contract with authorities. Marcinko denied the charges, saying it was a “witch hunt” carried out by top-notch naval officers whom he embarrassed by exposing the vulnerabilities inside their models.

Marcinko is pictured with his family

Marcinko is pictured with his family

He created the OP-06D Naval Security Coordination Team, also known as the Red Cell, which was trained to enter security zones, nuclear submarines, Navy ships and even Air Force One. The strength consisted of 13 men, 12 of whom were from Team SEAL Six and one from Marine Force Recon.

Towards the end of his career, he was concerned about what the Navy called a “bribe scandal”. They alleged that Marcinko conspired with an Arizona arms dealer to get $ 100,000 if he got a contract with the authorities for hand grenades.

Marcinko claimed the cost was the “consequence of a witch hunt” and “a flashback for exposing so many vulnerabilities” within the Navy.

He was sentenced to 21 months in prison for the “bribe scandal”, of which he served 15 months.

He is the author of a collection of books, an autobiography and the New York Times four-month bestseller, Leadership Secrets of the Rogue Warrior: A Commando's Guide to Success.

He is the author of a set of books, an autobiography and the New York Times four-month bestseller, Leadership Secrets of the Rogue Warrior: A Commando’s Guide to Success.

A video game, titled Rogue Warrior, was designed after his life and military career.  Action figures were also made in his likeness

An online game, titled Rogue Warrior, was designed after his life and career in the Navy. Action figures were also made in his likeness

After retiring from the Navy, Marcinko became CEO of a non-public security agency.

He is the author of a set of books, an autobiography and the New York Times four-month bestseller, Leadership Secrets of the Rogue Warrior: A Commando’s Guide to Success.

He also founded Richard Marcinko Inc., a coaching and team building company, and Red Cell International, Inc., which performs vulnerability assessments of high value properties and high risk targets.

An online game, titled Rogue Warrior, was designed after his life and career in the Navy. Action figures were also made in his effigy.

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